Investment Year LogoThe Investment Year (IY) is our program guiding our children in discovering, developing and deploying the skills, knowledge and character necessary for success in further education, future careers and in their personal lives.

One of our goals for our students is that they would understand and apply the concepts of self-sufficiency. As IY, we want to demonstrate and teach reliance on God as well as IY Sons working in Forge p8 seeing in what ways we can be involved in becoming ’self-sufficient’. However, if self-sufficiency is needing no outside help in satisfying one’s basic needs emotionally and being intellectually independent, able to provide for oneself without the help of others, then we should rethink this word, as those definitions take out the need for God. As a ministry, we are committed to demonstrating and teaching Christ-centered self-sufficiency. We are committed to teaching and trying to demonstrate reliance on God as our provider as well as discovering our roles and responsibilities in providing for ourselves. Questions we like to ask our IY’s are “What’s in your hands?” “What can you do?” as a way of encouraging our students to think through this area.

So how do we do that? ‘Self-sufficiency’ (Christ-centered selfsufficiency) one of our I.Y. core curriculum subjects taught during the year. In addition to the IY’s receiving teaching on ‘self-sufficiency’ we operate a couple of businesses to demonstrate self-sufficiency as well as receiving additional income for the IY program. The businesses help to provide valuable life skills for the IYs as they manage a real business.

The Forge:
For the last two years the Forge has been running at Kasana Children’s Centre. The Forge consists of a small café, a shop, and craft center. It is run by IY interns who make its food, restock its shelves, and manage its accounts. For those living at Kasana, it is one of the main places to buy food and even household goods as well as a good meeting point. For teams and visitors, it is a place to grab a snack and purchase local crafts. IY Coffee: We offer distinctive, bold Ugandan coffee, a perfect blend of arabica and robusta from Mount Elgon. The coffee business has been running for the last three
years and has proved to be successful in raising additional income (to supplement the support from sponsorship) to run the Investment Year program. The coffee is now being enjoyed in Uganda and in other parts of the world as visitors buy them and take them back to their home countries. It works well as everyone benefits – IY received additional income and the buyer receives great coffee!

2014 Plans:
IY Students displaying IY Coffee p8Next year our IY’s will have the opportunity and challenge in groups to run a small business as another way of developing skills and knowledge in self-sufficiency. They will follow the whole process through from the planning stage, delivery of business and evaluating at the end of the year.

For all you non-coffee drinkers, we will have something for you next year. As the coffee has proved to be so popular, we are planning to start selling smooth, balanced Ugandan tea next year as well.

By Steve Brown, Early Adulthood Coordinator
As published in the November NHU Newsletter

 How U Can Help

• Please pray that all our 2013 IY sons and daughters who have finished their IY year and  move on to their next stage of growth. Pray that what they have learned will move from their heads to their hearts and that they will enter next year with a clear sense of God’s calling and purpose for their lives.
• Please pray that our 2014 IY sons and daughters will enter next year with open hearts to all that God wants to do in them and through them.
• As we thank God for all the partners He has provided us, please pray for more opportunities for partnership between IY and internship providers and other organizations wanting to get involved in IY.
• Provide for a Lap-top computer for the Investment Year House (new or used) - $450 if new (10 needed)
• Provide for part or all of the Investment Year Father Heart retreat (2014) – $1500
• Provide part of all of Investment Year Kampala House rent for one year (2014) - $5,000

To donate – click here and write the appropriate designation in the comment box.

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Happy New Year from all of us in the Special Needs Department!
During this Christmas season when most of the children at Kasana have gone to stay with relatives and many staff have gone on leave, Special Needs remains busy, busy, busy. One of the things keeping us busy has been our children preparing for club foot surgery.
Thanks to the Moriarty Foundation based at St Luke`s Hospital in Ireland, we were able to begin this journey back in September as we began exploring options for Brian, Deborah and Kakooza – all of whom have club feet.

Brian & Deborah with their casts on.

Brian & Deborah with their casts on.

Christmas cards and cookies being delivered.

Christmas cards and cookies being delivered.

Theatre nurses at Kiwoko Hospital removing Brian`s POP casts.

Theatre nurses at Kiwoko Hospital removing Brian`s POP casts.

We began at Mulago Hospital in Kampala as at that time we did not think we could afford to use the specialist hospital in Entebbe known as CORSU. Then began weekly trips to Kiwoko for changing of plaster of paris casts. Unfortunately at this point, Kakooza Brian dropped out as despite the fact that we were paying for his Mum to bring him on a motorbike taxi, the family could not manage to keep up the appointments.
Brian and Deborah kept up the weekly visits to see Dr Peter and his team. At Christmas Brian and his friends at Kasana made them some Christmas cookies to say ‘thank you!’ for their hard work.
In mid December, a man from CORSU hospital came to Kiwoko with good news: the club foot surgery would be free if we could manage the small charge for upkeep whilst they were on the ward. And so off we went with our two patients who both had their casts changed and were told to report back on January 2nd – Brian for surgery on the 3rd and Deborah for a review.
On the January 2nd, Brian was admitted to the ward and operated on the following day. At this point we learned that he would require a series of operations and he is currently still there with his Mum and baby sister Kilabo. They will remain there until next Friday when the Doctors will do the 2nd procedure. Deborah was told to report back on the 9th ready for her first surgery on the 10th and then she and Brian can keep each other company.
We ask for your prayers for both of them as understandably they are both a little fearful of hospitals. Brian particularly hates having canulas put in and will fight the nurses as they struggle to insert them and later on pull them out! Please pray that God will eventually enable Brian to walk. Although it is unlikely that he will ever be able to walk without support, even being able to do so with a walking frame or crutches would be such an exciting achievement for Brian and also a relief for his well- worn bottom!
Please pray for safe travels as we make the long journey to Entebbe for surgeries and reviews. It is a particular challenge at this time of year as it is hot and very dusty and unfortunately our vehicle does not have air conditioning!
Lastly we ask you to pray for Kakooza Brian and his family. Kakooza has Spina Bifida as well as his Club Feet. They live far out in the bush and although he is 9 or 10 he has never been to school. He frequently has pressure sores, infected wounds and urine infections. Unfortunately, his Father is not willing for his Mother to put in the effort required for her son to have the surgery which would enable him to walk. Please pray that God will change this man`s heart and also that in the future Kakooza will have the chance to both have this surgery but also to go to school.
Thank you and may God continue to bless each of you abundantly in 2014.
Kate Tolhurst (Special Needs Programme Coordinator)

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Geoff, Mary and Dr. Vora.

Mary, Geoff and Dr. Vora.

We, the Britton family, have served at New Hope since 2006, learning and growing cross-culturally more than we ever could have imagined! We deeply love children and staff beyond what we ever thought possible with our limited human hearts. And we now understand in so many ways WE, OUR family are not only the five of us. At first introduction and on a very basic level, Ugandan culture immediately stretches the individualistic western mindset by introducing the WE of people and things. WE: The collective sense of all things together is seen practically through terminology and expectations.

When a new baby is born the question is “How is OUR baby?” When there is a need for a useful item the request is for, “OUR bicycle,” “OUR bicycle pump,” “OUR ladder,” “OUR motorbike,” “OUR car,” etc. When we cultivate the land, the garden yields OUR crops so that during harvest, much is shared. And of the children, WE parent them together by working together in tandem–consulting, praying, counseling, never in an individual sense at all. So, when I say WE had cancer, I say it in sincerity and truth. For not only are Geoff and I one in marriage and our children an outpouring of love from that union, but the New Hope family is a very real part of us and us of them. Though the suffering, the diagnosis, the treatment and recovery all took place continents and oceans apart, the New Hope FAMILY walked with us in prayer and through letters, phone calls and emails. When we had cancer, New Hope journeyed through it with us. Though this “WE” stretched our comfort zone in our first years here, it is now a deep and abiding blessing to our lives.

Enter God’s perfect timing: On the day we started chemo, we received a THICK package of letters from the children and staff in David Family. As he received

Geoff being greeted upon his return to Kasana Children's Centre.

Geoff being greeted upon his return to Kasana Children’s Centre.

chemo, I sat at Geoff’s side in tears as I read letter after letter of encouragement and love from our New Hope family. The package had been released from their hands long before that June day, but arrived in our hands in God’s time! In addition, often in the doctor’s offices our phone would buzz showing a New Hope number–the love and support coming again and again at just the right time. When we told Toby, Acacia and Kevin in April of the diagnosis, they cried. Now, before you think their tears were due to the real possibility of cancer bringing death, let me clarify that it was due to the inability to return to Uganda. Toby’s first question was, “You mean we can’t go home?” The real pain in his heart reflected the deep pain and sorrow in all five of us. So, we endeavored to remain thankful and we daily spoke aloud our blessings and thanksgivings to God in prayer and to each other. This brought a genuine thankfulness, joy and peace to our extended stay.

Every day in numerous ways our Father showed Himself faithful. Below are just a few of the intricate workings of God’s hand on us. We were stateside, among family and friends, and were able to share with them in person when the lymphoma diagnosis came AND it came early on in the disease process via a method not available in Uganda. The doctor who surgically removed the cancer from Geoff’s stomach “just in time,” is one to whom many travel from across the U.S. and other countries for treatment– one of the best in his field. Our oncologist acted boldly and quickly in our treatment plan and continued to treat the cancer aggressively, but us with kindness, over the course of six months.

Geoff is his first patient to be healed completely after only two treatments! God spoke clearly that He had chosen a house for us to live in and though we called on about 25 rentals, God led us to the right house and we moved in completely all in the course of ONE week- -unheard of in southern California! Six months worth of rent and 95% of donated furniture arrived in less than two weeks! Together we walked this. Together we triumphed. Together we came through victorious over cancer and fear. And we continue to walk together. Those at New Hope who feared we would not return have seen that our peace and contentment come from KNOWING that God is good. Even if Geoff had died, God is good. That fact has kept us settled, confident in His hand and His plan, His ways and His wisdom, and so we did not fear death or any other outcome. If Geoff had died, we would still be in relationship with a good God and He would still be our Loving and Abundant Provider, Savior, Creator, Friend, Father and the only One who NEVER changes in our life. This is the Fatherhood of God our New

Toby - happily back with his P7 classmates.

Toby – happily back with his P7 classmates.

Hope children have been able to see through our experience with cancer!

By Mary Britton
As published in NHUM’s November 2013 paper newsletter

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Our children get an opportunity to serve others by building a house for a family in need.

Our children get an opportunity to serve others by building a house for a family in need.

Desiring to tangibly display the Fatherhood of God, the Kasana Childcare Extension Program ministers to over 300 children in an eight-kilometer radius around Kasana Children’s Center. Extension cares for children living in the community by supporting their guardians, parents, or other relatives who are their primary caregivers. Over 80% of the children enrolled with Extension live with their grandmothers with the balance residing with single mothers, aunts, uncles, or grandfathers.

As the scope of the program expands, the Extension staff have witnessed many stories of God’s Fatherhood and redemption within our immediate community. Recently, Extension helped provide a new home to a single mother and her six children, two of whom are enrolled in New Hope’s program. The rainy season totaled their already leaking mud house. Praise the Lord nobody died when the house collapsed during a storm! Upon learning about the family’s situation, the Extension Program organized an Outreach where Extension children and staff joined community members to rebuild the family’s home.

In three days, the group completed the house and were able to roof it with iron sheets provided by the generosity of a donor. The family now has a structurally sound home big enough to accommodate all the children. Yet, God had more in store for this family. Previously struggling with alcoholism, the mother often left her children alone overnight. After the Extension Outreach Program and community rebuilt her house, she accepted the Lord and now attends church instead of questionable late-night discos and is more present as a mother to her children! In addition to housing projects, outreach teams also build latrines and help in various community members’ gardens – especially widows and grandmothers who cannot feed the children under their care. In conjunction with the New Hope Clinic, Extension staff conduct seminars training women and children on sanitation, hygiene, and disease prevention. Even covering simple topics such as lessons on hand-washing improves the lives of our children in the community. These programs reduce the risks children face living in the village.

Extension staff desire to empower parents and guardians to care for their children more effectively. Rather than handing everything the parent needs, a few children in a family are identified for sponsorship to reduce the burden on the whole family. This offers relief so that the guardians can recover without initiating a dependence cycle. Parents apply for admittance of their children to the New Hope program. During the application process, Extension staff visit the family to verify their situation and ensure that aid is distributed to appropriately deservingfamilies. The Childcare Administration office then conducts an interview with the family.

Every day work for Childcare Extension includes visits to assess the child’s environment in the areas of health, housing, academics, and family. A survey carried out during these sessions last term led to the purchase

and distribution of 114 mattresses and 80 blankets to children in the community. In cases of poor school performance or chronic absences, staff can help by providing bicycles to those who commute from a distance.

Happy children after over 80 blankets are given out.

Happy children after over 80 blankets are given out.

Over 25 bicycles have been distributed in the past year. Staff conduct practical teaching on parenting and discipline from a Biblical perspective with follow-up to see how these lessons are applied. When Extension determine that the children’s home continues to be non-conducive to physically, emotionally, and economically caring for them, the staff coordinate with New Hope staff families to transfer the children Kasana Children’s Centre.

A parenting seminar.

A parenting seminar.

Extension’s next chapter in bringing the Father of God to the fatherless involves opening a satellite family in the community. Home visits nine months ago revealed that a grandmother frequently left her Primary 3 (2nd grade) granddaughter alone. The Extension Office arranged for one of its staff living in the community to take the child into his home. This daughter now knows protection, love, and fatherhood evidenced by the peace and joy in her eyes. The staff member who took her into his family has also opened his heart and home to three other girls and anticipates being the official satellite family father once funds are raised to build a boy’s room.

Extension exists to engage the community to realize the needs within it and empower members to care for each other. As a result, our children benefit from stronger families and communities. Thank you for your prayers and support as we continue to care for our  many New Hope children living outside of the Kasana family groups.

by Charles Onyango, Childcare Extension Coordinator and Wesley Steeb, Administrative Assistant to the Manager

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Two campers enjoy a moment at Musana Camps beautiful waterfall.

Two campers enjoy a moment at Musana Camps beautiful waterfall.

It has been a wonderful year at Musana Camps. Hundreds of children have enjoyed the chance to get away to a unique environment and have heard the good news of the Gospel in the process; Ugandan men and women have been challenged and transformed by Biblical Manhood and Womanhood retreats; and multiple teams have come to serve at the camp and been blessed in return.

We praise God for all He has done, is doing and will do. More and more groups are interested in using the Camp and one of our current limitations is our size. Wemc1 could use your help in funding for additional accommodations for campers and towards our general fund. The complete list of current Musana Camps needs is below.

Musana Camps

  • Undesignated Gift to Go to Area of Highest Need in the General Fund – a large percentage of our operational funds come through gifts in this area – any amount would be very appreciated
  • Musana Camps Scholarships – pay for a day of Camp for a child - $15
  • Manhood/Womanhood Retreat Scholarships – pay for the retreat for one person – $48
  • Children’s camps for 2013-14 – $1,000 per camp x 10
  • Networking Equipment and Installation – $2,000
  • Water System Phase 3, last section of water infrastructure – $6,500
  • Workshop completion – $7,000
  • Camp cabins– $12,000 x 3
  • Staff duplex – $50,000

To donate to Musana Camps, click here and follow the steps. Once you get to the entry page, type “Musana Camps” and the specific designation in the comments box.

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Merry Christmas!

December 29, 2013 · 0 comments

in NHU

Angel appearing to Joseph as he sleepsWe at New Hope Uganda hope and pray that all you had a wonderful Christmas day. We also pray that we will all enjoy the gift of our Lord Jesus Christ all year long!

The Sunday before Christmas, those at Kasana Community Church were treated to a wonderful Christmas play put on by our children. In the photo, an angel appears to Joseph as he is sleeping.

God bless you!

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DSC_9217-fwKasana Children’s Centre is a lot quieter today. Yesterday, most of the children who live with us full-time left Kasana yesterday to visit with relatives. The next few weeks are  important time for our children to connect with an aunt or an uncle or Jaja (grandparent) or a cousin or a sibling. These relatives are unable to care for the children on a regular basis but they still can play an important part in their lives. We would appreciate your prayers for this time.

We would also appreciate your prayers and thoughtful consideration of New Hope Uganda as the year draws to a close. We have significant needs in our general budget and a large percentage of our budget usually comes in December. If you are interested in contributing to our general fund (operating fund), click here and put “general fund”or “where most needed” in the comment box.

We also have a list of specific needs. Today, we will focus on the Kasana Children’s Centre list. If you connect with one of the below needs, please click here and put that need in the comment box.

God bless you!

Kasana Children’s Centre Needs
• Undesignated Gifts to Go to Area of Highest Need in the General Fund –a large percentage of
our operational funds come through gifts in this area – any amount would be very appreciated
• Primary School Textbooks – $10 per book (hundreds needed)
• Secondary School Textbooks – $10 per book (hundreds needed)
Sponsorship ($35 per month for co-sponsorship, $70 per month for full sponsorship)
• Primary School Shelving – $400 per classroom (8 classrooms)
• Lap-top Computers for Staff (new or used) – $450 if new (20 needed)
• Lap-top Computers for Children – $450 if new (30 needed for Kasana lab)
• Lap-top Computers for Investment Year House (new or used) – $450 (10 needed)
• Funds to Pay for a Professional Ugandan Writer- $500 monthly
• “Bulldog” Hammer Drill + Bits – $500
• Standard Latrine for Children in Family Groups – $1,000 (5 needed)
• Networking Equipment and Installation – $1,000
• Post-Kasana Education Scholarship Fund (any amount)
• Replacement Roofing for Children’s Housing in Family Groups – $1,600 (4 needed)
• Funds to Complete Solar Set-up at Primary School – $2,000
• Server Computer – $2,000
• Flux Core Mig Welder + wire, extra gun – $2000
• Sealed Latrine for children in Family Groups (in low water table areas)- $2,750 (1 needed)
• Funds for Football, Netball, Basketball, Track Travel in 2014 – $4,000
• Vocational Institute Fencing – $4,000
• Compactor – $4,800
• Accounts Software Upgrade – $7,000
• Vocational Institute Hostel – $15,000
• Shop Upgrades – $15,000.
• Construction Maintenance Van – $20,000
• Additional Primary Classroom – $25,000 x 2
• Primary School Admin Block (to finish school) – $50,000
• Institute of Childcare and Family Meeting Hall – $50,000
• Staff Duplex – $50,000 x 2

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Sisters Rashida and Alea.

Sisters Rashida and Alea.

What is the difference between these two 12-year-old girls? One was born in a 3rd world country and one was born in the United States of Abundance. We do not get to choose if we are born into poverty or wealth, but we do get to choose what we do with the resources we’ve been given. In the USA, we have earning potential and job opportunities that most people in 3rd world countries don’t have. So our family has decided to use our income to help those less fortunate than ourselves. It is not our money; it is God’s money, and we are simply passing on the blessings He’s given us. Our family motto is “We live simply so others can simply live”. We make intentional lifestyle choices that keep our monthly
budget very low, so that we can sponsor children in Uganda and Kenya (the two countries God has laid on our hearts). We only have two biological children (Alea age 12 and Jonas age 10), but our life has been greatly enriched by our 12 Ugandan children! We started
off with 10 children and through praying for them and corresponding for 3 ½ years, we developed a sincere love for them and a sense of attachment that these really are “our kids”.

There are an endless number of worthwhile programs through amazing Christian organizations making a

July 2013 The Haywood Family (Joey, Anissa, Alea age 12, Jonas age 10) with 6 out of the 11 children they sponsor at Kasana.

July 2013 The Haywood Family (Joey, Anissa, Alea age
12, Jonas age 10) with 6 out of the 11 children they sponsor at Kasana.

dent in poverty, to which you can contribute financially (digging wells, feeding programs, clean-water projects, AIDS Clinics, etc) but child sponsorship is the most personal on-going way that our family has found to make a difference. We are particularly impressed with New Hope Uganda’s sponsorship program. It is a holistic approach that provides spiritual growth, education, clean water, food, vitamins, medical care, shoes/clothes, bedding, etc.

If you ever do have the opportunity to visit your sponsored child, take it. After our dream came true and we met our sponsored children for
the first time in July 2011, the bond was sealed! These are Jonas and Alea’s brothers and sisters and these truly are our children. It was such
a gift to have two weeks to get to know their unique personalities, spend time playing, and laughing and worshipping with them. Words cannot express the overwhelming joy it was to have a voice attached to the face we’d been praying over for all those years, to have the child in the photo come alive with personality, to be able to wrap our arms around them and physically embrace those already dear to our hearts!

It is so neat to see the special bond that Jonas and Alea have, not only with their same age siblings, but their older brothers and sisters as well. The love runs deep! Our hearts overflow with maternal/paternal pride at their talents, godly characteristics, hard work ethic and selfdiscipline;
we are honored to sponsor young adults who will become leaders and role models for the younger generation.
We were blessed to come back two years later, this past July 2013, to once again visit our children and see how they’d grown (physically, spiritually, academically, emotionally). What a glorious family reunion that was! Our eldest son, has already graduated and is now earning a paycheck as of August, so we were able to take on another younger student in his place.
Even though we no longer sponsor our eldest New Hope son, he will always be our son and no one can take his place in our hearts!

At New Hope, we also got to see first-hand our sponsorship dollars at work. During the home visits with our sponsored children, they showed us all the things we had helped provide for them: the new mattresses, the shoe polish for their school shoes, etc. We got to participate in a mass distribution of blankets, that just happened to be while we were at Kasana in August of this year. The children were all told that the blankets were from their sponsors. We got to walk with one of the girls we sponsor to the clinic to get medicine for her rash. We saw the daily chewable vitamins being passed out in the Primary School and the porridge being served daily. We have also enjoyed getting to know our childrens’ teachers, families and caregivers, family groups, friends, etc. We now have quite an extensive African family on many levels.

Even for those who may never make it to Uganda to meet their sponsored child in person, the love grows strong, through letter writing and praying regularly for “your” child. You will become a real part of that child’s family and a part of New Hope’s call to provide the Fatherhood of God to the fatherless. We encourage each one of you, no matter what other ways you might be gifting your finances, to also consider sponsoring a child and/or promoting sponsorship at your church or elsewhere.

By Anissa Haywood

As printed in New Hope Uganda Ministries November 2013 paper newsletter (to see the entire newsletter click here)

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P1100053Every morning, farm workers attend to the growing herd of cows at New Hope’s Enterprise Farm and sell the milk locally.

The purpose of this dairy business and other projects at the Enterprise Farm is to help support the rest of Kasana Children’s Center in Christ-centered self-sufficiency. Because we want to be good stewards of God’s gifts, projects like the dairy business are maintained and continually grow. The cow you see in the picture was donated by  Nora (10 years-old) and Rachel Larson (8 years-old)  in 2011.

By Brevin Anderson

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Shakira, Shakira

December 10, 2013 · 0 comments

in NHU

Shakira. If you look carefully, you can see a little of her war wound!!!

Shakira. If you look carefully, you can see a little of her war wound!!!

THANK YOU all of you who have been praying for Shakira’s recovery from open heart surgery. The little cutie is now very much home with us back at Kasana and is slowly but surely doing very well! I should have updated you a few days ago but time does fly by here! Anyway, as I say, Shakira is doing well and we will be heading back to Mulago Heart Institute on

Shakira with her Mum.

Shakira with her Mum.

Wednesday for a review and echo.

We ask that you continue to pray for good health for Shakira. Please also pray that Mum, Shakira and sister Samiya really bond closer and stronger as a family, and that they would experience Father God’s love for them more and more.

A big THANK YOU also to the last minute donations from various thoughtful people around the globe – May HE bless you.

By Stu Dendy, Hope Family In-Charge

 

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